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Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an advanced method of creating images of the inside of the body without using X-rays or other forms of ionising radiation.

It uses a combination of strong magnetic fields and radio waves, and a computer to produce pictures of any part of the body.

MRI scans can be used to image the brain and spine, the heart and blood vessels, the liver and biliary system, kidneys and urinary tract, pancreas, uterus and ovaries, bowel and any sites of inflammation and tumour growth.

 

In the musculoskeletal system, MRI is used to evaluate:

  • joints for trauma, including ligament and tendon injuries and fluid collections, meniscal tears in knees, degenerative and arthritic changes;
  • muscles for strains, tears, haematoma, infection and other forms of inflammation;
  • bones for fractures (including stress fractures), bruising and inflammation including osteomyelitis, and tumours;
  • soft tissues for cysts and tumours;
  • the spine for disc disease including protrusions and discitis, fractured and collapsed vertebrae, spinal cord and nerve root compression and inflammation within or around the spinal cord.

 

About the Service

The MRI services at the Trust are provided by Alliance Medical.

There are facilities available at St Peter's Hospital (Departmental Block, Level 2) and Ashford Hospital.

 

Contact details:

  • Tel: 01932 872444
  • Fax: 01932 872440
  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Information Leaflets

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MR Angiography

An MRA scan is a relatively new technique for examining blood vessels in the body.

The advantages are that it is non-invasive, requiring only a simple intravenous injection or, in some instances, no injection at all. The other attraction is that it does not require any exposure to Ionising Radiation.

MRA uses a very strong magnetic field plus radio-frequency waves to excite hydrogen nuclei (protons) contained within water in the blood vessels. The excited hydrogen nuclei gradually lose their excess energy in the form of radio waves that can be detected by special receiving coils placed close to the body part being examined.

By using series of pulses of such energy before and after the injection of a special dye (gadolinium) which highlights blood vessels, and by digitally subtracting one set of images with dye and those without, an image can be built up which clearly shows the vessels ... read more

 
Click to download
 

MRI Musculoskeletal

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an advanced method of creating images of the inside of the body without using X-rays or other forms of ionising radiation. It uses a combination of strong magnetic fields and radio waves, and a computer to produce pictures of any part of the body. MRI scans can be used to image the brain and spine, the heart and blood vessels, the liver and biliary system, kidneys and urinary tract, pancreas, uterus and ovaries, bowel and any sites of inflammation and tumour growth ... read more